Tango Misterio - Our Videos und CDs - Tango Misterio

Konzert und Milonga
life on stage
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Recordings:
At concerts and performances we have CDs with us, which you can buy. Would you like to receive a CD? Just write to us.


Unerhört - Tango Misterio (2011)
1. Tango
2. El Tigre Milan
3. Maria
4. Milonga
5. La Rayuela
6. Valse Criollo
7. La Cumparsita
8. Vuelvo Al Sur
9. Misteriosa Vida
10. Se Fu Sin Decirme Adios
11. Es Major Olvidar
12. Comme Il Faut
13. Oblivion
14. Vuelvo Al Sur (Reprise)



Studio recordings for the new album are underway.



Excerpts from amateur recordings of our performances




Derecho Viejo - Old Law
The music was written by Eduardo Arolas (real name: Loreno Arola), born 24 February 1892 in Buenos Aires, died 1924. He was also called El Tigre del bandoneon. Arolas was a bandoneonist, composer and conductor.
Arranged by Sergio Martin Rodriguez.

With Sexteto Bonavena (Argentina) and Tango Misterio
Piano: Sebastian Boeris und Anja Konjen
Bandoneon: Nicolas Placido
Bass Clarinet: Federico Nunez
Guitar: Sergio Martin Rodriguez
Viola: Pablo Mancini
Violin: Katrin Wehle
Cello: Hellfried Knopsmeier
Double Bass: Luis Carcacha und Alexander Göpfert

Trend for 2020/21: Online-Concert withmusicans arroung the world. We are there.

Uno - One
transferred: Someone

The music was written by Mariano Mores (real name: Mariano Martinez), born 18 February 1918 in Buenos Aires, died in 2016. Mores was a pianist, conductor and composer.
The text was written by Enrique Santos Discépolo, born 27 March 1901 in Buenos Aires, died 1951. Discépolo was a poet, composer, actor and dramaturg.


Milonga
Excerpt from a joint concert with Wenzel Konjen (drums), the Paranormal String Quartet and Falk Schönfelder.

The Milonga is the cheerful and exhilarating sister of tango. This milonga is by Diego Marcelo Collatti, a contemporary composer, pianist and author who was born in Argentina in 1995.


Vuelvo Al Sur - I go back to the South
Excerpt from a joint concert with Wenzel Konjen (drums), the Paranormal String Quartet and Narvas Schöne Felder.

The text is a poem about the intimate love to the South.
... I carry the South as the destiny of the heart. I come from the south, like the air out of the Bandoneon ...

A composition by Astor Pantaleon Piazzolla (born 11.03.1921 in Mar Del Plata, died 1992). He played piano and especially bandoneon, was a composer and arranger, not only of tangos, but also of classics. With his orchestra Octeto Buenos Aires, founded in 1955, he is considered to be the founder of Tango Nuevo.
The text is written by Pino Solanas (born Fernando Ezequiel Solanas), born 16 February 1936 in Argentina.
Solanas studied theatre, piano, composition and law, and was (and in some cases still is) a lyricist, composer, film director, screenwriter and is politically engaged.

Garganta Con Arena - Throat with sand
a tango from 1993
Excerpt from a joint concert with Wenzel Konjen (drums), the Paranormal String Quartet and Narvas Schöne Felder.

"Look! The day is not dawning (yet), Polaco Coyenesche, sing me another tango.
See! The night, it's still long. Your life has the destiny to sing, to sing over and over again....Your voice, of goblins and ghosts, breathes like the asthma of an old bandoneon."

The title tells about the characterful tango singer Roberto Goyeneche 'El Polaco' (1926-94).
Goyeneche is said to have pursued an independent and unconventional artistic lifestyle as a bon vivant. His voice is clearly recognisable among the many.

Lyrics and music were written by Cacho Castaña (born Humberto Vicente Castagna), born 11 June 1942 in Buenos Aires, died in 2019. Castaña was a singer, lyricist and composer at the same time.


Desde El Alma - From the soul
transferred: From the deepest soul

Valse Criollo
Creole originally stood for the population of South America, which had a European (mainly Spanish) origin. Today, it is used for solid components of South American culture, cuisine, music and others, that have European or African influences. The Creole Waltz (or Peruvian Waltz) is an adaptation of the waltz brought by Spaniards from Europe to South American sounds and rhythms. As a symbiosis between Afro-Peruvian, European and indigenous elements, it became an integral part and expression of South American lifestyle at the beginning of the 19th century (similar to Merengue and Salsa). As a Vals, he is an integral part of the Argentine Tango.

The music is by Rosita Melo (real name: Clotilde Mela Rosa Luciano), born 09 July 1897 in Uruguay, died 1981. Melo was a composer, pianist, poet and lyricist. As a teenager, she composed the title Desde El Alma, which made her, as one of the few female composers of the region, known worldwide. Her poems were published in daily newspapers of her time, and later in a volume of poetry.
The text used today for Desde El Alma was added to the title from Victor Piuma Vélez (1892-1976, Melo's husband) around 1922, and later rewritten by Homero Manzi (1907 to 1951) around 1947.
We use the version rewritten by Homero Manzi in 1947.


Corazon De Oro - Heart of Gold

The music was written by Francisco Canaro (real name: Francisco Canarozzo), born November 26, 1888 in Uruguay, died in 1964. Canaro was also named "Pirincho" or "El Kaiser". He was a violinist, mandolinist, arranger, and composer.


Notas Del Corazon - Notes of the Heart

Music by Eduardo Arolas, dedicated to his beloved mom. Eduardo Arolas (real name: Loreno Arola), born 24 February 1892 in Buenos Aires, died 1924. He was also called El Tigre del bandoneon. Arolas was a bandoneonist, composer and conductor.

Por Una Cabeza - To a horse's head
transmitted: by a (horse) head length

The text is about a player who compares his gambling addiction in horse racing with the unfulfilled attraction of a beautiful woman.
... because of a head length, a days' loss of bets, that coquettish and cheerful woman who lies smiling with love, and burns all my love on a pyre ...

Texted by Alfredo Le Pera, born 07 June 1900 in Brazil, died in 1935, at the same time as Carlos Gardel, in a plane crash. Le Pera was a journalist, poet and writer.

The music was written by Carlos Gardel (born Charles Romuald Gardés) on 11 December 1890 in France (or Dec. 1887 in Uruguay). Gardel was a composer, singer and film actor.

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